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The Truth About Concussions

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Human brain X ray

Human brain X ray

Getty Images/iStockphoto

Getty Images/iStockphoto

Human brain X ray

Cara Correll, Junior Writer

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All it takes is one blow to the head. According to Prevacus Inc., high schoolers experience an estimated 300,000 concussions per year. Each concussion leaves students worried about how it will affect their academic and social life–after all, concussions occur after an impact to the head that causes the head and brain to shake quickly back and forth.. How do concussions affect high school students?

Concussions, and their symptoms, are not all the same. Many people think that a loss of consciousness accompanies a concussion, but that is not always the case. Symptoms depend on how serious the trauma is, and they could be in effect as long as months after the injury. Some symptoms include memory loss, double vision, vomiting, and sensitivity to light. If the pupils are different sizes, or if the speech is slurred, the concussion is serious enough to warrant a doctor’s appointment, according to HealthLine. During recovery, a concussed individual might experience irritability, and difficulty concentrating. A head trauma can also cause dizziness due to brightly lit rooms, and constant headaches because of loud noises or a large group of people in classrooms.

Depending on how intense the concussion was, a student athlete can return to sports only until most concussion symptoms are absent. Due to the chances of another concussion, a football or basketball player might want to take a longer break than a student athlete that swims. Ultimately, after one concussion, students are up to three times more likely to experience another because of brain chemistry and carelessness, according to ScienceLine. One concussion causes chemical changes to your brain that can leave it lopsided and exceptionally prone to more damage. Students typically want to get back to playing as soon as possible, but a rapid comeback can be dangerous. Reaction time and reflexes are not at one hundred percent, making even everyday activities like crossing the street hazardous for everyone, not just high school students.

All in all, concussions shouldn’t be taken lightly. Just one blow to the head can negatively affect a high schooler for up to one year, making academics and sporting activities harder and harder to carry out. Be smart, and take your time–after all, the damage is permanent.

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The Truth About Concussions